Chainsaw Won’t Start: What You Need to Know to Avoid This Problem

Chainsaws are one of the most powerful handheld tools there is. It’s also one of the heaviest, and that’s because its internal parts are similar to an automobile’s. Because of this, you could encounter problems in your handheld machine. One of this is finding out that your chainsaw won’t start.

However, like a vehicle, you can troubleshoot this with a bit of effort. It may seem intimidating to fix a chainsaw, but it’ll cost you less money. With that said, stick around to find out the issues behind the chainsaw’s operation!

What are the Possible Reasons?

Similar to a car engine, there can be some reasons as to why your chainsaw won’t start. What’s important is, you know how to troubleshoot. Knowing where to look first is the key to getting the problem fixed.

Here are some possible reasons as to why your chainsaw won’t start:

The spark plug

For starters, if your chainsaw won’t start, one of the most common reasons might be the spark plug. Check first if the spark plug is creating a spark. As we all know, it is the spark plug that is responsible for igniting the cylinder and getting the air-fuel mixture combusted.

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However, if you regularly use your chainsaw (and for extended periods of time), it is very natural that the spark plug will corrode and wear out. When this happens, your spark plug might fail to initiate the air-fuel combustion.

Don’t worry, though. That does not always mean that you have to replace it right away. It might just need a little cleaning.

The Carburettor

Another reason might be the carburettor. The carburettor, on the other hand, might get clogged or very dirty over time. That applies in particular when you leave fuel in your chainsaw’s tank for too long.

If you think this might be the reason as to why your carburettor won’t start, then it might be best to start cleaning. You can only use a carburettor cleaner to remove any gunk or solid residues.

However, again, if the carburettor still doesn’t work properly, then it might be best to get it replaced.

The Fuel Tank

As for the fuel tank, there are two things you might want to check if you think that the problem is within the fuel tank. First is if there is enough good fuel in the reservoir and second is the fuel mixture.

Just as we mentioned earlier, if you leave fuel in the chainsaw for too long, some of its components will evaporate already and leave thicker substances as gunk or residue. It is the same residue that has the potential to clog your carburettor.

It is essential to check now and then if the fuel in your tank is an adequate amount and in good condition. Then for the fuel mixture, it is vital that your chainsaw has the correct mixture of gasoline and oil.

It is a fundamental requirement for two stroke engines such as the one used in chainsaws. Use only a two-cycle oil that is suitable for chainsaws. But most importantly, refer to your manual for the gasoline-oil ratio. Do not guess or estimate.

The Air Filters

Dirty air filters can also cause your chainsaw not to start. That is because a dirty air filter tends to draw more gas than air and not serve its purpose. It can also cause the chainsaw’s engine to produce more unburned fuel.

And more unburned fuel means more carbon deposits. An increased amount of carbon deposits (and of course, a dirty air filter) can cause your chainsaw to be idle. Therefore, it is a must to keep the air filters clean.

After all, you will only need soap and water to do the cleaning.

The Ignition Coil

Fifth would be the ignition coil. The ignition coil is what’s sending voltage to your chainsaw’s spark plug while you’re using it. Again, this is the same with a car’s engine. A faulty ignition coil is all that it takes to down a chainsaw.

If you’ve already checked the carburettor, air filters, spark plug and others, then you might want to test the ignition coil. When you are inspecting, be sure to see if the connections are in their proper places. It must be in full contact and correct order with the spark plugs.

Moreover, check for external damages around the coil. Tears can be pretty common with the coil, so be on the lookout. If you’re unsure, you can only use an ignition coil tester to see if it needs replacement.

The Recoil Starter

And finally, the recoil starter. Keep in mind that the recoil starter has a lot of different elements unlike other parts of the chainsaw. The recoil starter is the one responsible for “initiating” the engine when you start your chainsaw.

So it might either just be the rewind spring or the recoil starter pulley. When either of the two is defective, then your chainsaw will have a hard time starting. However, you can simply just get a rewind spring replacement or a new recoil starter assembly.

Now, there might still be a lot of other causes that we might not have discussed, but these are just some of the most common. Proper care and maintenance for your chainsaw are what will lengthen its lifespan.

Wrapping It Up

After finding out the possible causes of your broken chainsaw, it’s easy to see why it’s like a car. Similar to a car, you should provide proper maintenance and constant care to this convenient yet powerful tool.

Remember, it’s all about the fundamental things when it comes to the chainsaw. Regularly check the fuel efficiency, cleanliness of the components, and the conditions of the spark plugs. If you maintain this consistently, it’ll be a pinch to keep your outdoor weapon running efficiently.

With that said, good luck in handling your chainsaw! If you found this article informative, don’t forget to leave us a like, and share this with your friends!

This website was created and is supported by a person who has been in the business of working with power tools, dedicated to home improvement projects both professionally and for the do it yourself type of person.

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