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Metal Roofing Vs. Shingle Roofing: Which Should You Choose?


Metal Roofing Vs. Shingle Roofing: Which Should You Choose?

On the one hand, you have metal roofs known for their energy efficiency, fire resistance, and low maintenance required.

On the other hand, you have asphalt shingle roofing known for its ease of installation, lower costs, and ease of availability.


So, which of the two should you install in your home?

This article here will help you understand the differences between the two.



However, we always recommend that you get in touch with a local roofing contractor like WDR Roof Repair Austin to get more of personalized advice that will better suit your needs.

metal roofings vs shingles roofings

Varieties

Metal roofs are available in a variety of styles, depending on the metal used, as well as the coatings applied.

Aluminum roofs are moderately priced and need no coating while steel roofs are expensive and require a specialized treatment to guard against rusting.

Aside from aluminum and steel roofs, you can also find copper, stainless steel, tin, zinc, and titanium roofs.

Asphalt shingles are available as fiberglass shingles, traditional organic shingles, and architectural shingles.

Fiberglass shingles have a layered make-up while traditional organic shingles require a felt layer underneath the asphalt.

Architectural shingles, also known as laminate shingles, are heavier, thicker, and more expensive than the traditional organic shingles. Additionally, these shingles have a 3D appearance that many homeowners are attracted to.

 

Cost

When it comes to the initial cost, expect to pay much more for a metal roof than you would with a shingle roof.

Metal roofs can cost as much as $800 per 100 square feet, while shingle roofs will only cost you about $200 per 100 square feet.

The good thing is that you will get more life out of a metal roof. Additionally, they are pretty energy efficient, meaning you will end up cutting costs on your monthly heating and cooling costs.

At the same time, installing a metal roof could increase the resale value of your home and make you eligible for tax credits and insurance discounts.

Shingle roofs are economical in the short term, and this is what often appeals to many homeowners.

Additionally, shingle roofs have more warranty coverage, including Manufacturer error, Contractor error, Material defect, Maximum wind-resistance limit, etc.

When it comes to costs, however, Home Advisor cautions that some architectural shingles could cost much more than lower-end metal roofs.

 

Installation and Repair

Installing a shingle roof requires less specialized knowledge, and the job can even be done with basic tools. Depending on the size of the house, you can take as little time as a day or two to finish installing the roof ( Metal Roofing Vs. Shingle Roofing)

Metal roofs require more skilled and specialized labor to install. However, metal is a much lighter material, and the roof can be installed over an existing roof.

Roofing with metal takes a long time, and this is because there is the extra step of layering oriented strand board (OSB) under the metal sheeting for noise proofing.

This is not the case with shingles seeing as you would first need to remove the previous roof before installing a new one.

It is generally easier to find a contractor who deals with shingle roofs while it is harder to find an experienced metal roofing contractor.

Also, the precision installation required means that the labor-intensive process of putting up a metal roof allows for very little room for errors.

When it comes to repairs, shingles are much easier and cheaper to fix should a failure occur. You can easily remove the shingles one by one and apply the necessary fix.

Repairing a metal roof ( Metal Roofing Vs. Shingle Roofing) is a little complex because you have to deal with full-length panels connected together.

 

Appearance

Metal roofs are available in a wide variety of styles and colors that can suit any home. The only downside is that a metal roof can look too industrial and out of place in a suburban setting.

Most neighborhoods employ shingle roofing, and so a metal roof would fall out of favor with the HOA, not to mention that it won’t blend in with the surrounding houses.

Asphalt shingles are a visually appealing option available in a variety of color and texture options. This kind of roofing easily blends in with other houses in the neighborhood.

Asphalt shingles are even available in varieties that look like wood shakes, slate, and tile.

 

Durability

Metal roofs have a lifespan of 40 to 70 years, while shingle roofs have a lifespan of about 20 years on average. Higher grade shingles that are heavier can last up to 30 years before needing to be replaced.

Metals such as copper and zinc roofs have been known to last as long as 100 years, meaning you will never replace the roof once you have installed it.

 

Environmental Friendliness

Metal roofs are 100% recyclable. Any tear-off panels, leftover pieces, and damaged parts can be recycled for future use.

In fact, nearly 95% of all aluminum roofing is already recycled materials.

Asphalt shingles are a petroleum-based product, which means that they encourage dependency on fossil fuels.

Also, shingle roofs need to be replaced more frequently than metal roofs do. So, you will end up with more shingles in the landfill than metal roofs.

Metal roofs have a reflective quality, which adds to their energy efficiency by blocking heat transmission to the interior of the house. At the same time, the roof can come with specialized paint coatings, which further reduced your cooling bills.

 

Fire Resistance

All metal roofs are fire resistant; steel and copper being more resistant than aluminum. The fire-resistant property makes metal roofs ideal for use in areas that are prone to wildfires.

If hot embers or ashes fall on a shingle roof, it’s likely that the roof will catch fire. However, some shingles, especially the fiberglass varieties, are rated Class A for fire safety.

Before you go, I would recommend you take a look at this video below to understand more about differences of shingle roofing and metal roofing.

 

 

 

 



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