What Are the Socket Sizes in Order From Smallest to Largest

Do you know the classification of socket sizes in order from smallest to largest? This particular guide will show the proper arrangement of sockets based on their measurements.

If you are working with socket drives all the time, you might have a vast repository of collections already. You have the big ones down to the smallest ones. You might even have those units that have quirky shapes.

Collecting all these items is quite fun because it is not spontaneous. It takes time and dedication to find all those sockets and wrenches. Moreover, working with those tools on a day-to-day basis makes them extremely useful and handy. Therefore, forgetting them is already close to impossible.

However, arranging the tools, especially the sockets are quite difficult. It would be hard to arrange them, especially if you are just going to guess their sizes through their appearance. It would still be proper if you know the exact measurements of every socket that are present today and see where they fall on the table. In this way, you can easily file these components based on their exact measurements. It will also allow you to determine which exact socket drive you need for a particular application.

Therefore, if you are quite curious about the ordinal ranking of sockets, the table that I provided below will give you a clear insight. Check it out now!

Six-point metric socket measurement

Socket Sizes in Order from Smallest To Largest

Drive Sockets (1/4-inch Size)

  • Six-point metric socket measurement:

4 mm, 4.5 mm, 5 mm, 5.5 mm, 6 mm, 7 mm, 8 mm, 9 mm, 10 mm, 11 mm, 12 mm, 13 mm, 14 mm

  • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) measurement:

5/32 in, 3/16 in/ 7/32 in, 1/4 in, 9/32 in, 5/16 in, 11/32 in, 3/8 in, 7/16 in, 1/2 in



Drive Sockets (3/8-inch size)

  • Six-point metric measurement

5.5 mm, 6 mm, 7 mm, 8 mm, 9 mm, 10 mm, 11 mm, 12 mm, 13 mm, 14 mm, 15 mm, 16 mm, 17 mm, 18 mm, 19 mm, 20 mm, 21 mm, 22 mm, 23 mm, 24 mm

  • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) measurement

1/4 in, 5/16 in, 11/32 in, 3/8 in, 7/16 in, 1/2 in, 9/16 in, 5/8 in, 11/16 in, 3/4 in, 13/16 in, 7/8 in


Drive Sockets (1/2-inch size)

  • Six-point metric measurement

8 mm, 9 mm, 10 mm, 11 mm, 12 mm, 13 mm, 14 mm, 15 mm, 16 mm, 17 mm, 18 mm, 19 mm, 20 mm, 21 mm, 22 mm, 23 mm, 24 mm, 25 mm, 26 mm, 27 mm, 28 mm, 30 mm, 32 mm

  • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) measurement

3/8 in, 7/16 in, 1/2 in, 9/16 in, 5/8 in, 11/16 in, 3/4 in, 13/16 in, 7/8 in, 15/16 in, 1 in, 1-1/16 in, 1-1/8 in, 1-3/16 in, 1-1/4 in.


Drive Sockets (3/4-inch size)

  • Six-point metric measurement:

19 mm, 22 mm, 24 mm, 26 mm, 27 mm, 28 mm, 30 mm, 32 mm, 34 mm, 36 mm, 38 mm, 41 mm, 42 mm, 45 mm, 46 mm, 48 mm, 50 mm

  • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) measurement:

5/16 in, 1-1/8 in, 1-3/16 in, 1-1/4 in, 1-5/16 in, 1-3/8 in, 1-7/16 in, 1-1/2 in, 1-5/8 in, 1-3/4 in

Drive Sockets (1-inch size)

  • Six-point metric measurement

36 mm, 38 mm, 41 mm, 46 mm, 50 mm, 54 mm, 55 mm, 58 mm, 60 mm, 63 mm, 65 mm, 67 mm, 70 mm, 71 mm, 75 mm, 77 mm, 80mm

  • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) measurement

15/16 in, 1 in, 1-1/16 in, 1-1/8 in, 1-1/4 in, 1-5/16 in, 1-1/2 in

Take into account that sockets come in different lengths or depths. However, many manufacturers classify their sockets to either of these specific categories: deep and standard.  

The end of the sockets has a square-shaped recess. Standard wrenches fit there. In the case of consumer wrenches, these square recesses are categorized into this size: 3/4 inch, 1/2 inch, 3/8 inch, and 1/4 inch. In the past, we have seen some manufacturers that created 5/16 inch socket drives. Today, these are rare variations already. However, few produce them for special applications.

Conclusion

Just like what I have mentioned, knowing the size order of these sockets is important. They enable you to work with the appropriate sockets all the time without suffering from delays due to second thoughts and guessing. Memorizing these sizes might come difficult at first, but if you are using them from time to time, you will get the hang of them eventually.

Did you learn from this article? If you have other questions and suggestions, feel free to drop them below.

Thomas Roberge
 

This website was created and is supported by a person who has been in the business of working with power tools, dedicated to home improvement projects both professionally and for the do it yourself type of person.

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