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How To Repair Your Monogramming Sewing Machines?


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Monogramming Sewing Machines

Embroidery and monogramming are all about sharpening your skills and keep on learning as it is a continuous process. But even the most professional of personnel can fall victim to a broken needle, the thread not bumming right or the machine simply not picking up the bobbin. You must be able to identify the monogramming related problems with your machines and then at the end of the day be able to fix them or otherwise it is a total bummer. This article is all about teaching you about the little repairs you can do yourself while working on your monogramming sewing machine without much effort.


Problem; Thread bunching under the fabric

For many people, they can have a perfectly straight stitch on the upper side but inconsistent stitches in the bottom, what do you think is causing this problem? The fix to this problem is pretty simple, just let go of the presser foot and rethread the machine. It will definitely open up the tension mechanism within the machine to pick up the thread. And you will also need to raise the take-up lever and needle to the highest position, if you need assistance with it then you can read your machine's manual. It will confirm that you have the right tension and the machine is now taking up the bobbin in a consistent manner.

 



Problem; Monogramming machine not picking up the bobbin

This has been an extremely common monogram related problem for so long but at the end has a common solution. When your needle descends to pick up the thread you must try holding the thread towards the left and then check if the bobbin thread is even present with the help of a darning needle.

Try rethreading the machine as in most cases it alleviates the problem for most of the users. The tension within the bobbin screw must be adjusted accordingly, it should not be either too high or too low or otherwise, the tension mechanism won't take the bobbin in. As these bobbins are present in different shapes and types so the one which is causing the problem for you might not be feasible for your machine. Make sure that your needle is properly fitted within the holder prior to stitching as this will account for seamless stitching and a consistent array of stitches both on the upper and the lower side of the fabric.

If nothing works then try to calibrate the timing of the machine as it might prove effective in resetting the tension mechanism of your monogramming sewing machines for good.

 

Problem; Stitches are coming out uneven

The main problem here could be the needle as it might be a little bent, broken, out of shape, or simply damaged. As experts always recommend that you must change your needle every 16 hours of stitching time. Many people have the practice of pulling the fabric while stitching it to make sure that the stitches come out to be clean and study but this in reality can fumble the machine or break it once and for all. So instead of forcing the embroidery machine to get a better stitch on your fabric, you must try to let the machine do all the work at its own pace and stitching speed.

 

Problem; the needle keeps breaking

For most of the beginners in the Monogramming world, this could be a devastating problem. Some users even report that their needles were breaking all over them even after they installed the new ones and clasped them really hard into the mold so it would fit entirely. Out of the many types of needles, there are you must be able to understand the tenacity of the fabric you are working on and in turn examine the needle that you are using to get the job done for you.



If you are using a lightweight needle onto a heavy leather clothing then it would automatically break. That is why it is important that you only work with a specific needle that has a particular type and build required to work on the fabric that you are trying to work on. This way the needle won’t break and you will not be hitting any bumps along the road when enjoying a feisty monogramming experience for yourself. 

 


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