Best Home tools reviews

Types Of Kitchen Sinks You May Not Know Yet!

A look at the many facets of Types Of Kitchen Sinks

All Types Of Kitchen Sinks sit within the space cut out in the countertop or cabinet, so apparently, all sinks might look alike. However, on looking closely, you can make out the distinctive features of each that help to differentiate one from another. Besides the unique features, the nature of the use of sinks also defines its type like the corner sink and prep or bar sink. However, the primary classification of sinks is done not according to the design but the kind of installation it requires. For example, a Kraus undermount kitchen sink is different from a drop-in sink in the manner of installation with the latter placed into the cut out in the countertop from the top while installing undermount sinks from the underside of the countertop is the norm.

The available kitchen space and the size of the countertop are also factors that influence the sink size. You must also consider the ease of installation and your budget to choose a sink that meets your requirements. What kind of usage you have is also a factor in sink selection. It will influence the design in terms of the number of bowls.  Understanding the different ways of sink classification will make a choice easy and clear all confusion about design and style as well as usability.

types of kitchen sinks

types of kitchen sinks

 


Types Of Kitchen Sinks classification by method of installation

According to the method of installation, there are two main types of sinks – drop-in sinks and undermount sinks; there are other types as well.

Drop-In sinks – It is easy to make out from the name that drop-in sinks are the ones that you can drop into the opening created on the countertop for placing the sink. The sink has a lip or rim along the top edge so that it can rest nicely on the countertop and bear the load of the sink.  Once in place, the sink is held firmly with clips and screws from the bottom side of the countertop to provide adequate support. The installation is very easy, and these sinks can accommodate one or more faucets depending on the number of holes that it has.

Apron-front sinks – This sink is a variant of drop-in sinks and has a deep bowl but derives its name from the special design feature of an apron or board on one side of the edge that extends in the front. The method of installation is like any drop-in sink. It requires modification of the countertop to accommodate the apron. You can either place in the front or on the side, depending on the sink dimension and space available. If the apron is in the front, then the face of the cabinet under it needs to be shorter and smaller to provide the space for accommodating the apron. Farmhouse sink is another name for apron sinks.

Undermount sinks – Undermount sinks look different from drop-in sinks in that it does not have any lip or rim because the sink is installed not from the top but the bottom of the countertop. The sink is positioned just under the cut out on the countertop from the bottom and supported with clips and brackets that hold it in place. Since there is no rim or lip, the edge of the sink flushes with the sides of the opening entirely, and no part of it is visible on the countertop. It results in a sleek appearance, and cleaning the countertop around the sink is smooth and easy.

Wall mount sinks – Unlike the other sinks that rest within the countertop, wall-mounted sinks hang from the kitchen wall at a height that is convenient for users. The sink is supported from behind by brackets on which the sink rests. This types of kitchen sinks has a vintage appeal and made from cast iron, stainless steel, or porcelain depending on whether used for industrial kitchens or farmhouse themed kitchens.  

Sink classification by the nature of use

Another method of classifying sinks is to identify it by usage or placement when using a secondary sink in addition to a primary one. These sinks add more convenience in kitchen work and installed for performing specific tasks from which it derives its name.

Prep or bar sinks – You must have heard about prep sinks, which many people call bar sinks. It is a small sink installed in addition to the main sink for the exclusive purpose of performing small tasks like washing hands, which is an intermittent requirement in kitchens and rinsing fruits and vegetables. To install bar sinks, the kitchen must have enough space to fit two sinks, or else you may have to settle for just one sink, in which case the prep sink could become the only sink in the kitchen.

Sink classification by design

The design of the sink creates a distinction between sinks that have single bowls and those that have double bowls. While single bowl sinks are most common, double bowl sinks also find many takers. Since double bowl sinks are larger and much heavier in design besides capable of carrying heavier load during use, these require undermount installation for providing the right support.

Single bowl sinks – This is the most common type of sink that you will come across because of the immense flexibility in size and shape, as well as ease of installation, and most such sinks are drop-in types. Single bowl sinks are available in various shapes besides the regular rectangular shape, and it is also available in a circular and semi-circular shape. The sinks are quite affordable, and the large bowl allows easy cleaning of large utensils.

Double bowl sinks – You will find this type of sink in most modern kitchens. The Types Of Kitchen Sinks has two bowls that can either be of the same size or one bowl smaller than another. Usually, the depth of double bowl sinks is more than the single bowl sinks. You can even have two bowls of the same size but different depths.

Balancing your needs and the kitchen size as well as your budget and using the above information should help in choosing the right sink.

 

 

Leave a Comment



4 Shares
Share
Pin
Tweet
WhatsApp